Day 213 – Marseille, France

We parted with Nimes this morning and got on a train heading for Marseille. Our train ride was brief and comfy. Upon arriving, we stored our bags at the train station instead of heading to our hotel as usual (since our hotel was located on the outskirts of Marseille). Since Marseille is quite large (the second largest city in France) we wanted to take full advantage of our only day here. As we exited the train station and began exploring Marseille, we were truly underwhelmed. The city seemed really dirty, there was graffiti everywhere, and the general vibe of the city seemed shabby. If was not until we entered the city center area that we discovered Marseille’s hidden charms.

(Eglise des Reformes)

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(Arc de Triomphe)

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(Cathedrale de la Nouvelle Major)

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(Vieux Port)

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(Aerial views of Marseille)

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(Basilique Notre Damn de la Gard)

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(Chateau D’if – made famous by the Count of Monte Cristo)

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(Chateau)

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(Various scenes from Marseille)

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2 Responses to “Day 213 – Marseille, France”

  1. Aunt Jan Says:

    It’s good to know that you found the more pristine parts of Marseille. I’m surprised that there is so much dirt, etc., as many shop owners, etc., throughout France practice the age-old tradition of sweeping the streets every morning. Marseille is an area where one starts to see more of the Mediterranean influence–architecture, etc.

    By the way, escargots cooked in garlic, butter, and white wine are excellent. They taste very similar to chewy chicken! There is an art, however, to getting the critters out of their shells. Try some!

    • I too was very surprised by Marseille. In certain parts of the city I had a hard time believing I was in France. The city center, the harbor, and the immediate outskirts are fairly nice but when you venture out a little bit… the city appears quite rough.

      I have sampled snail cuisine in Poland and it is indeed tasty (my uncle in PL use to raise them on his farm and sell them to French restaurants).

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